Dr. Mohammed Nazmul Huq
Dr. Mohammed Nazmul Huq Professor, Department of Statistics

PROFILE


SHORT BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Mohammed Nazmul Huq is employed as the Professor of Statistics at the Jahangirnagar University. He did his M.Sc. in Statistics in 1995 and completed his Ph. D. in health economics in 2013. Dr. Huq has more than twenty-five publications to his credit so far and has published several articles in the renowned international journals such as Journal of AIDS & Clinical Research, HIV & AIDS Review, International Journal of Pharmacology, Health Affairs, Journal of Health Economics, Health Economics, The World Bank Economic Review, Maternal and Child Health Journal and Lancet.

Dr. Huq works as a Consultant with leading research organizations of the country. He has been involved in the design, analysis and report writing process of a number of research studies in the health and education sectors. Since 2000, he has been involved in more than 60 research works in health, nutrition and education sectors.

Dr. Huq also participated in numerous international training workshops and seminars organized by the Global Fund, UNAIDS, WHO, UNICEF, East-West Center/USA, UNDP, UNFPA, MEASURE Evaluation Project at the University of North Carolina, Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS), OECD, EUROSTAT, Asia Pacific Health Economics Network (APHEN), WHO Western Pacific Regional Office (WPRO) and Friedrich Naumann Stiftung/Germany.

RESEARCH INTEREST

Research interest covers a wide range of public health issues including HIV/AIDS, reproductive health and FP, food and Nutrition as well as Health Equity, Quality of Care (QoC), Benefit Incidence Analysis (BIA), identifying the poor, impact of health on productivity and hardship of the poor.

JOURNAL PAPER

Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Saima Khan, Atikur Rahman, Rawnak Jahan and Sabina Yasmin, Ending HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Bangladesh by 2030, Journal of AIDS & Clinical Research, Volume 11, 6, 2020. doi: 10.37421/jar.2020.11.812

Abstract: The international community has committed to ending HIV/AIDS epidemics throughout the world by 2030. We address whether this optimistic target for HIV/AIDS is achievable in Bangladesh. The study provides a roadmap for what is required in Bangladesh to end AIDS within the next 10 years (by 2030), which remains aligned with the Sustainable Development Goal 3.3. For ending AIDS in Bangladesh rapid scaling up of prevention and treatment coverage would be required. We have shown that the Fast-Track approach is predicated on a rapid scale-up and maintenance of focused, effective prevention and treatment services over the next 10 years i.e., by 2030.

Saima Khan, Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Masud Reza, Zakir Hossain, Md. Anisur Rahman, Prioritizing Investment Options for Ending AIDS in Bangladesh, Jahangirnagar University Journal of Science, 41, 1, pp.99-112, 2018. doi: ISSN 1022-8594

Abstract: Although Bangladesh maintained low prevalence of HIV in general population (<0.1%) and most key populations (KPs) (<1%), new HIV infections are increasing and in certain geographical areas KPs have higher HIV prevalence. The study examines different investment options in HIV/AIDS for achieving the global targets on treatment and „Ending AIDS by 2030‟. Data from national surveillances, other studies, and programs were used for analysis. The AIDS Epidemic Model (AEM) analysis reveals that with the ongoing interventions only 31.3 percent of adults in need will receive ART by 2030 and new HIV infections among KPs will still slowly increase. Rapid scale-up of prevention and universal treatment coverage through geographical prioritization, will limit new infections in Bangladesh to <300/year and the global goals will be achieved by 2030. The key investment strategy should also include scaling up behaviour change interventions, HIV counseling and testing focusing on key populations, early treatment for people found to be HIV positive and community adherence support.

Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Saima Khan, Md. Anisur Rahman, HIV and AIDS among people who inject drugs in Dhaka city – what might have happened if interventions were not in place?, Jahangirnagar University Journal of Science, 40, 1, pp.55-71, 2017. doi: ISSN 1022-8594

Abstract:

Background: In Bangladesh HIV is concentrated in key populations (sex workers, men who have sex with men, people who inject- drugs/PWlD, hijra/trangender).  Prevalence among PWID was 5.3% in Dhaka in 2011. This study focuses the influence of high risk network exposure (HRNE) among PWID and ongoing progmm efforts on HIV transmisslon in Diaka city.

Methods: The AIDS Epidemic Model (AEM) is used to assess the combined influence of structural factors and harm reduction program elements on HIV risk. It replicates transmission dynamics in Asian settings using behavioral and biological information of key populations to project the HIV epidemic. This study compares three scenarios in Dhaka to assess how interventions have influenced the HIV epidemic based on changes in HRNE since 1998. Time series data till 2012 was collected.

Results: The estimated annual new HIV infections is 124 in 2014, which could be 12-times higher (1,468) in the absence of interventions since 1998 even if the high risk network is sustained. If prevention interventions were not in place since 1998 and high risk PWID networks are assumed to be doubled, the number ofannual new infections for 2014 could be even higher. The estimated number of new HIV infections, PLHIV and AIDS related deaths will be increased significantly in the coming years in the absence of any HIV prevention interventions among key populations to sustain the high risk behaviour networks among PWID. With no interventions, HIV prevalence among males who inject drugs would be about 23% when high risk network is doubled. When interventions are continued, the HIV prevalence range among PWID (male) in Dhaka city will remain between 5- 60%, which matches the current serological surveillance finding.

Conclusion: A sustained prevention progmm can contain the epidernic. Controlled high risk network exposure among PWID has minimized the risk of HIV spread within PWID in Dhaka city. In order to prevent an HIV epidemic in Dhaka city the Government of Bangladesh should continuously mobilize resources for continued impact.

Mohammed N. Huq, Saima Khan , Wiwat Peerapatanapokin, Masud Reza, Zakir Hossain, Zubair Shams, Md. A. Rahman, Modes of HIV transmissions in Dhaka city, HIV & AIDS Review . International Journal of HIV-Related Problems, 16, 2, pp.112-117, 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.5114/hivar.2017.66898

Abstract:

Introduction: The epidemic in Dhaka, capital city of Bangladesh, was believed to be driven by injecting drug use as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been concentrated among people who injected drugs since 2006. However, the needle/syringe program coupled with other prevention interventions among the key populations (KPs) and may have limited HIV spread from people who inject drugs (PWID) altering the modes of transmission (MOT).

Material and methods: The AIDS Epidemic Model was used to assess probable HIV transmission modes, which used data and information on indicators and co-factors from national behavioral surveys, serological surveillances, and other relevant studies including program data from 2000-2013.

Results: The distribution of HIV infections by MOT reveals that in 2000, needle sharing was the major source of HIV infection (48%) in Dhaka, followed by (female) sex work (30%), male-to-male sex (12%), heterosexual relationships (husband to wife, 9%), and other sources (1%). In 2014, needle sharing as a mode of transmission dropped to 28%. In the same year, male-to-male sex accounted for 42% of new HIV infections. It is projected that male-to-male sex will be responsible for 54 percent of new infections by 2020 in Dhaka.

Conclusions: The needle/syringe exchange program and other interventions among KPs have shifted the MOT in Dhaka city. Human immunodeficiency virus intervention strategies and coverage in Dhaka should be revised and focused to address the evolving epidemic.

M Nazmul Huq, Sushil Ranjan Howlader, M A Kabir, Dipika Paul, Paying Out of Pocket for Healthcare in Bangladesh – A Burden on Poor?, The Jahangirnagar Economic Review, 26, 2015. doi: ISSN 1990-2492

Abstract: Out of pocket (OOP) expenditures for healthcare are largely unpredictable and usually have a diminishing impact on the poor households. The large expenditures on healthcare have catastrophic impacts on household welfare and poverty issues. This study examines the degree of the impact that out-of-pocket expenditures for healthcare on household spending patterns and on poverty in Bangladesh. According to this study, approximately 29.2% of the households employ more than 5% of their total living resources for health care facilities. The OOP healthcare expenditure can be sufficiently expensive as 25.5% of the population in Bangladesh is extreme poor. Healthcare expenditures add another 4.2% population (5.8 million people) to the extreme poverty. This strongly provides the evidence that low health facilities and status of the population is a major factor for the persistence of poverty and it can be relieved by proper targeting and provisioning of public healthcare.

Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Sushil Ranjan Howlader, Redistributive Effects of Public Healthcare Financing in Bangladesh, The Jahangirnagar Review, Part II: Social Science, XXXV, 2011. doi: ISSN 1682-7422

Abstract: Payments towards healthcare, apart from securing access to health services, may also redistribute income. This redistribution may be intended or unintended. Even in the latter case, policy makers are interested in the degree to which it occurs because of consequences for the distribution of goods and services other than health care and, ultimately, for welfare. This study examines whether public healthcare financing has any impact in reducing the welfare loss of the poor of the country. The study is based on empirical analysis of a nationally representative Household Income Expenditure Survey 2005. The analysis reveals that healthcare financing in Bangladesh induces a positive total redistributive effect and hence reducing inequality. In the absence of public healthcare financing, its redistributive effect would be negative and poor would pay more in relation to their income. This confirms the potential redistributive benefits associated with the public health programs and leads to justify further public investment in the health sector.

Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Sushil Ranjan Howlader, Saptarshi Dhar, Efficiency of Public Healthcare Resource Allocation in Bangladesh, Jahangirnagar University Journal of Science, 2015. doi: ISSN 1022-8594

Abstract:  The Government of Bangladesh (GoB) is committed to provide quality health care services to improve the health status of the people, especially the poor. But, public resources allocated to this task are limited. Further, the poor receive less public resources allocated to health than that of the rich of the country. The purpose of analyzing the MoHFW’s resource allocation is to assess whether the existing allocation across districts and lower level facilities is based on the health needs of the respective geographical location as well as the poverty status. The analysis of the findings reveals that on an average, a very poor district receives Taka 192 per capita only whereas its actual need is Taka 276 per capita. On the other hand, a non-poor district, on an average, receives more resources (Taka 209 per capita) as compared to its actual need estimated at Taka 31 per capita. This, in turn, indicates that MoHFW requires to adopt a pro-poor allocation system so that poor districts receive more resources and maximize equity in the health sector.

Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Sushil Ranjan Howlader, M. A. Kabir, The Impact of Health on Productivity in Bangladesh, Global Journal of Quantitative Science, 1, 4, pp.24-31, 2014. doi: ISSN: 2203-8922

Abstract: Health is important to explain individuals’ productivity. Poor health can leads to less productivity and pushes into poverty. However, in Bangladesh, attention is hardly given in this issue. Emphasis of this study is to inform policy makers about health impact on labor productivity and its interventions. Study was based on statistical analysis of respondents aged 15-65 years from nationally representative Household Income Expenditure Survey-2005. Health status, productivity, and health impact is measured by days of illness 30 days prior to survey, natural logarithm of individuals’ hourly wage, and internal rate of return to health respectively. Analysis of rate of returns to health by urban and rural locations reveals improvements in health conditions have a greater impact on productivity. Improving individual health conditions can raise household wages and improve living standards. Therefore, national policies should focus on this issue to maintain social stability, economic growth and well-being of people.

M Nazmul Huq, Sushil Ranjan Howlader, M A Kabir, Targeting the Poor for Health Sector Subsidies in Bangladesh, Jahangirnagar University Journal of Science, 2013. doi: ISSN 1022-8594

Abstract: The Government of Bangladesh (GoB) is committed to provide quality health care services to improve the health status of the people, especially the poor. But, public resources allocated to this task are limited. As a consequence, poor receives less public resources allocated to health as compared to the rich people of the country. In order to benefit the poor more, it is important that the health sector be devised with appropriate strategies and interventions for benefiting the poor more from public health care subsidies. This, in turn, requires that the sector properly identifies the poor. To this endeavor, this study introduces a Proxy Means Testing (PMT) model that serves as a tool to identify beneficiaries of social programs. Instead of asking about income directly, the approach relies on indicators that are highly correlated with household income yet are easy to collect, observe, and verify. In order to develop the model, the study uses the nationally representative Household Income Expenditure Survey (HIES) 2005 conducted by Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS). The PMT model developed for Bangladesh suggests that it can identify the poor with a high degree of accuracy confirming the fact that it can be adopted for offering public health care subsidies to the poor.

MA Kabir, MN Huq, Abul Quasem Al-Amin, Gazi Hababubul Alam, Community Participation on Health and Family Planning Programs in Bangladesh: The Role of Education and Knowledge on HFP for Plummeting Pharmaceutical Costing, International Journal of Pharmacology , 8, 1, pp.10-20, 2012. doi: DOI: 10.3923/ijp.2012.10.20

Abstract: Old fashioned Community Participation (CP) in Healthcare and Family Planning Programs (HFPPs) requires a number of revisions in order to confront the challenges of 21st century. Fundamentally operating any large project likewise HFPPs requires a mammoth budget. It is thus important to have some financial gains and savings for a state from the relevant areas by introducing a newer project. Evidences assert that HFPPs consumes a higher endowment without reducing the pharmaceutical cost in the respective area. Thus, in such situations, state faces financial constraints by introducing supplementary or a parallel projects. Considering this issue as research problem, this study was conducted in Bangladesh to understand the impact of community participation on HFPPs. An analytical justification is used to discover the factors that are causing the problems for existing HFPPs. Observation also notes that HFPPs fails in plummeting pharmaceutical service costing in the respective area. It rather works as marketing tool for pharmaceutical business. Additional findings indicate that socio-economic condition, basic knowledge and fundamental awareness are essential in receiving the extended benefit. In addition to these, integration of CP and HFPPs may overcome the problems of the gap between demand and available resources for meeting the extensive healthcare that a country needs. However, it is also somehow constrained because of inadequate education and knowledge in the respective area of the rural population who are the key dependents on HFPPs. Therefore, we emphasize both on the redesigning of existing HFPPs and education attainment for the long term benefits. Our study is witness to support extensive CP in existing HFPPs and advocate why current system needs to be redesigned including the plummeting pharmaceutical service costing in the way forward for Bangladesh.

Mrigesh Bhatia, Ravi Rannan-Eliya, Aparnaa Somanathan, Mohammed N Huq, Badri Raj Pande, Batbayar Chuluunzagd, Public Views Of Health System Issues In Four Asian Countries, Health Affairs, 28, 4, 2009. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.28.4.1067

Abstract: To elicit the public’s views on health system issues, we conducted an opinion poll survey in Bangladesh, Mongolia, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. We focused on health inequalities. The results show high levels of dissatisfaction with government health services in all four of the countries. Access to government health services was an important concern. A sizable number of respondents reported that their governments did not consider their views at all in shaping health care services. The policy implications of the study findings are discussed. 

Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Jamil H Chowdhury, Ahmed Al-Sabir, Quality of Care in Reproductive Health and Family Planning Services in Bangladesh, Jahangirnagar University Journal of Science, 33, 1, pp.129-142, 2008. doi: ISSN 1022-8594

Abstract: Quality of care (QoC) has emerged as a critical element of reproductive health and family planning (RH-FP) programs in Bangladesh. Attaining significant progress in quality of care in all areas of RH-FP service will accelerate the achievement of the targets set in millennium development goals (MDGs) and poverty reduction strategy paper (PRSP). The primary objective of the study is to assess the current situation of quality of care in RH-FP services in Bangladesh. The study is largely based on primary data. It covered 64 public healthcare facilities covering all three tires of healthcare system - primary, secondary and tertiary levels. One specialized tertiary level facility is also selected for comparison where feasible. The analysis of the findings reveals that the primary level facilities are not capable of maintaining privacy during counseling. Adequate clean water supply, access to electricity and toilet facilities are also not available at the primary level facilities. In general the selected facilities have majority of the equipments in working condition but in many cases the providers do not use them due to their negligence. Shortage of essential drug is an area of concern. Infection prevention as well as poor monitoring and supervision have been pervading as weak areas. In contrast, the tertiary level facility is an ideal service delivery point in respect of the many aspects of quality. In order to ensure quality of care in RH-FP programs it is important to create adequate physical facilities of the centers with provision of waiting, counseling and maintenance of privacy. Trained providers with effective interactive ability and client friendly behaviour need to be ensured. Furthermore, regular and adequate supply of essential drugs and supportive monitoring and supervision should be ensured.

Owen O’Donnell, Eddy van Doorslaer, et. al., Who pays for health care in Asia?, Journal of Health Economics, 27, 2, pp.460-475, 2008. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhealeco.2007.08.005

Abstract: We estimate the distributional incidence of health care financing in 13 Asian territories that account for 55% of the Asian population. In all territories, higher-income households contribute more to the financing of health care. The better-off contribute more as a proportion of ability to pay in most low- and lower-middle-income territories. Health care financing is slightly regressive in three high-income economies with universal social insurance. Direct taxation is the most progressive source of finance and is most so in poorer economies. In universal systems, social insurance is proportional to regressive. In high-income economies, the out-of-pocket (OOP) payments are proportional or regressive while in low-income economies the better-off spend relatively more OOP. But in most low-/middle-income countries, the better-off not only pay more, they also get more health care.

Eddy van Doorslaer, Owen O’Donnell, et. al., Catastrophic Payments for Health Care in Asia, Health Economics, 16, 11, pp.1159-1184, 207. doi: https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.1209

Abstract: Out‐of‐pocket (OOP) payments are the principal means of financing health care throughout much of Asia. We estimate the magnitude and distribution of OOP payments for health care in fourteen countries and territories accounting for 81% of the Asian population. We focus on payments that are catastrophic, in the sense of severely disrupting household living standards, and approximate such payments by those absorbing a large fraction of household resources. Bangladesh, China, India, Nepal and Vietnam rely most heavily on OOP financing and have the highest incidence of catastrophic payments. Sri Lanka, Thailand and Malaysia stand out as low to middle income countries that have constrained both the OOP share of health financing and the catastrophic impact of direct payments. In most low/middle‐income countries, the better‐off are more likely to spend a large fraction of total household resources on health care. This may reflect the inability of the poorest of the poor to divert resources from other basic needs and possibly the protection of the poor from user charges offered in some countries. But in China, Kyrgyz and Vietnam, where there are no exemptions of the poor from charges, they are as, or even more, likely to incur catastrophic payments.

Owen O’Donnell, Eddy van Doorslaer, et. al., The Incidence of Public Spending on Healthcare: Comparative Evidence from Asia, The World Bank Economic Review , 21, 1, pp.93-123, 2007. doi: 10.1093/wber/lhl009

Abstract: The article compares the incidence of public healthcare across 11 Asian countries and provinces, testing the dominance of healthcare concentration curves against an equal distribution and Lorenz curves and across countries. The analysis reveals that the distribution of public healthcare is prorich in most developing countries. That distribution is avoidable, but a propoor incidence is easier to realize at higher national incomes. The experiences of Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and Thailand suggest that increasing the incidence of propoor healthcare requires limiting the use of user fees, or protecting the poor Effectively from them, and building a wide network of health facilities. Economic growth may not only relax the government budget constraint on propoor policies but also increase propoor incidence indirectly by raising richer individuals’ demand for private sector alternatives.

Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Tarana Tasnim, Maternal Education and Child Healthcare in Bangladesh, Maternal and Child Health Journal, 12, pp.43-51, 2007. doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-007-0303-3

Abstract: Child health is one of the important indicators for describing mortality conditions, health progress and the overall social and economic well being of a country. During the last 15 years, although Bangladesh has achieved a significant reduction in the child mortality rate, the levels still remain very high. The utilization of qualified providers does not lead to the desired level; only a third relies on qualified providers. This study is mainly aimed at investigating the influence of maternal education on health status and the utilization of child healthcare services in Bangladesh. This study is based on the data of the Household Income Expenditure Survey (HIES) conducted by the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS) during 2000. The analysis of the findings reveals that 19.4% of the children under five reported sickness during 30 days prior to the survey date. Moreover, approximately one out of every thirteen children suffers from diarrhoea in the country. It is striking to note that a significant portion of the parents relied on unqualified or traditional providers for the children’s healthcare because of low cost, easy accessibility and familiarity of the services. The study suggests that maternal education is a powerful and significant determinant of child health status in Bangladesh. Maternal education also positively affects the number of children receiving vaccination. In order to improve the health condition of children in Bangladesh maternal education should be given top priority. The public policies should not just focus on education alone, but also consider other factors, such as access to health facilities and quality of services. Health awareness campaign should be strengthened as part of the public health promotion efforts. More emphasis should also be given to government-NGO (Non Government Organization) partnerships that make vaccination programs successful and, thereby, reduce the incidence of preventable diseases.

Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Factors Influencing Utilization of Healthcare Services in Bangladesh – Analysis of the Data of a National Survey, Jahangirnagar University Journal of Science, 30, 1, 2007. doi: ISSN 1022-8594

Abstract: The utilization rates of government facilities are quite low although most of the services are either free or of nominal charges.  As a result, private providers both qualified and unqualified play an important role in healthcare sector of Bangladesh.  The main objective of the study is to understand how different socio-economic and demographic factors influence the health seeking behaviour of individuals, especially the poor and the severely ill. In Bangladesh, approximately 17 percent of the country’s total population has reported illness and among them, almost half have relied on unqualified or traditional providers.  The utilization of public providers has been still very low; only 12 percent of sick respondents have visited public facilities for healthcare.  In contrast, about 9 percent of sick people have relied on their self-prescription and another 7 percent have not taken any care at all.  The analysis reveals that utilization of qualified providers has been significantly influenced by age, education, income status, residence, severity of illness and location of the sick people.  The high treatment cost and long distance also have negative impact on their selection process. In order to improve the existing health seeking behaviour, awareness creation programs should be introduced to make people conscious regarding the long-term impact of these unqualified traditional treatments on internal health.  Moreover, the unqualified traditional providers should be provided with adequate trainings through public-private partnership. In order to ensure the quality of care the monitoring and supervision should also be strengthened through community participation where little attention has been paid so far.

 

Eddy van Doorslaer, Owen O'Donnell, et. al., Effect of payments for health care on poverty estimates in 11 countries in Asia: an analysis of household survey data, Lancet, 368, 9544, pp.1357–1364, 2006. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69560-3

Summary

Background: Conventional estimates of poverty do not take account of out-of-pocket payments to finance health care. We aimed to reassess measures of poverty in 11 low-to-middle income countries in Asia by calculating total household resources both with and without out-of-pocket payments for health care.

Methods: We obtained data on payments for health care from nationally representative surveys, and subtracted these payments from total household resources. We then calculated the number of individuals with less than the internationally accepted threshold of absolute poverty (US$1 per head per day) after making health payments. We also assessed the effect of health-care payments on the poverty gap—the amount by which household resources fell short of the $1 poverty line in these countries.

Findings: Our estimate of the overall prevalence of absolute poverty in these countries was 14% higher than conventional estimates that do not take account of out-of-pocket payments for health care. We calculated that an additional 2·7% of the population under study (78 million people) ended up with less than $1 per day after they had paid for health care. In Bangladesh, China, India, Nepal, and Vietnam, where more than 60% of health-care costs are paid out-of-pocket by households, our estimates of poverty were much higher than conventional figures, ranging from an additional 1·2% of the population in Vietnam to 3·8% in Bangladesh.

Interpretation: Out-of-pocket health payments exacerbate poverty. Policies to reduce the number of Asians living on less than $1 per day need to include measures to reduce such payments.

Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Mst Ferdouse Begum, Education System in Public and Private Universities & Educational Background of the Students, The Jahangirnagar Review, Part II: Social Science, XXV-XXVI, 2002.
Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Tarana Tasnim, Economic Consequences of Tobacco Consumption in Bangladesh, The Journal of Statistical Studies, 24, 2004. doi: ISSN 1022-4734
Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Kazi Saleh Ahmed, Zahurun Nessa, Monitoring the Changes in Educational Scenario of Rural Bangladesh, FREPD, 2004. doi: ISBN 984-8638-00-8
Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Kazi Saleh Ahmed, Enrolment In Primary Education In Bangladesh - Projection For 2000-2020, The Journal of Statistical Studies, 21, 2001. doi: ISSN 1022-4734
Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Begum Ismat Ara, An Evaluation of Job Satisfaction of Women Employees Working in Different Occupations, The Cost And Management Accountant, 2, XXIX, 2001.
Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Begum Ismat Ara, Problems and Prospects of Women Employment in Bangladesh, The Cost And Management Accountant, XXVII, 5, 1999.

BOOK

Shah Ehsan Habib, Sushil Ranjan Howlader, Mohammed Nazmul Huq, et. al., Assessment of impact of harm reduction interventions among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Dhaka city, Published by National AIDS/STD Programme (NASP) under Director General of Health Services (DGHS), Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW), Bangladesh, 2014.

Copyright © 2014: National AIDS/STD Programme (NASP) under Director General of Health Services (DGHS), Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW), Bangladesh

ISBN 978-984-33-8438-6

Published in collaboration with: Save the Children, UNAIDS Bangladesh,  International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b)

M. A. Matin, Mohammed Nazmul Huq, Janamity (Demography), Shomoy Prokashon, Banglabazar, Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2003.

ISBN 984 458 4035


Academic Info

Institute: University of Dhaka
Period: 2013

PhD in Health Economics

Institute: Jahangirnagar University
Period: 1994-1995 (Exam held in 1997)

Exam: MSc in Statistics

Result:  First Class First

Institute: Jahangirnagar University
Period: 1991-1994 (Exam held in 1996)

Exam: BSc (Hon’s) in Statistics

Result:  First Class First

Institute: Chittagong University School and College
Period: 1991

Exam: Higher Secondary School Certificate (HSC)

Group:  Science

Result:  First Division with Star Marks

Institute: Chittagong University School and College
Period: 1989

Exam: Secondary School Certificate (SSC)

Group:  Science

Result:  First Division with Star Marks

Experience

Organization: Jahangirnagar University
Position: Professor
Period: Dec 2015 to present

Responsible for taking courses on Advanced Probability Theory and Stochastic Process, Queuing Process and Inference. Also guided Students' research work.

Organization: Jahangirnagar University
Position: Associate Professor
Period: Nov 2011 to Dec 2015

Responsible for taking courses on Statistical Inference, Probability Theory and Stochastic Process. Also guided students' research work.

Organization: Jahangirnagar University
Position: Assistant Professor
Period: Nov 2003 to Nov 2011

Responsible for taking courses on Sampling Distribution, Calculus (Quantitative Methods), Probability Theory and Stochastic Process. Also guided students’ research works.

Organization: Jahangirnagar University
Position: Lecturer
Period: Sep 2000 to Nov 2003

Responsible for taking courses at both Honours and Masters level on Advanced Probability Theory and Stochastic Process, Numerical Analysis and Basic Computer Programming and Sampling Distribution

Organization: Asian Institute of Management and Information Technology
Position: Part-time Faculty Member
Period: Sep 2000 to Jan 2001

Responsible for taking course on Quantitative Methods in Business in the BBA Program

Organization: Asian University of Bangladesh
Position: Part-time Faculty Member
Period: Jan 2000 to Aug 2000

Responsible for taking courses on Business Statistics, Quantitative Method and Statistical Methods in the MBA and BBA Programs

Activity

Organization: Bangladesh Institute of Management, UChicago Research Bangladesh and Gotiii Consultation Network consortium
Position: Principal Investigator
Period: Jun 2020 – Aug 2020

Midterm Evaluation of SBCC interventions of IEM Unit of DGFP: As the Principal Investigator of Bangladesh Institute of Management, UChicago Research Bangladesh and Gotiii Consultation Network consortium, responsible for conducting Midterm Evaluation to evaluate the effectiveness of SBCC interventions of IEM Unit of DGFP/MoHFW. Primarily responsible for providing overall guidance to the research team, development of research methodology, report writing and dissemination of the study findings.

Organization: UNAIDS
Position: Consultant
Period: Aug 2018 – Mar 2019

Update the 2015 Investment Case to facilitate planning for transition with strengthened domestic fund support: The purpose of this UNAIDS assignment is to update the previous Investment Case on AIDS for Bangladesh. As a Modeler works closely with ASP, UNAIDS, Save the Children and icddr,b and responsible for AIDS Epidemic Model (AEM) analysis, report writing and finalizing the investment case through stakeholders consolation.

Organization: Research, Training and Management (RTM) International
Position: Team Leader
Period: Nov 2017 – Mar 2018

Mid-term Evaluation of Nirapod-2: Empowering Women on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and Choice of Safe Menstrual Regulation (MR) and Family Planning (FP): As the Team Leader of RTM International, responsible for conducting the Mid-term evaluation of the Nirapod-2 project of Marie Stopes Bangladesh. Primarily responsible for providing overall guidance to the research team, finalizing survey design, report writing and dissemination of the study findings.

Organization: UNAIDS
Position: Consultant
Period: May 2017 – Dec 2017

End Line Survey (Behaviour) on Continuation of the Prioritized HIV Prevention Services among key Population in Bangladesh funded by the Global Fund: As the Consultant of UNAIDS provide technical support to strengthen the M&E capacity of the National AIDS/STD Program to meet Global Fund compliance requirements. Primarily responsible for providing proper guidance and technical support to the Research Agency hired for conducting the End line Survey under the Global Fund HIV grant.

Organization: Network of PLHIV Bangladesh
Position: Consultant
Period: Apr 2017 – Nov 2017

HIV/AIDS Related Stigma and Discrimination against PLHIV in Bangladesh: 2nd National Stigma Index, Bangladesh: As the consultant of Network of PLHIV Bangladesh works closely with UNAIDS, UNFPA, Bandhu Social Welfare Society (Bandhu) and Ashar Alo Society and responsible for training of data collection staff, guidance to the data processing team, data analysis, report writing and dissemination of the study findings.

Organization: Marie Stopes Bangladesh
Position: Consultant
Period: Sept 2016 – Dec 2016

Endline evaluation of “Improved access to and utilization of affordable, quality sexual reproductive health services and information among marginalized and low income women, men and young people of the underserved areas of Brahmanbaria and Mymensingh districts in Bangladesh” project: As the consultant of Marie Stopes Bangladesh responsible for conducting the endline survey, data analysis, prepare the evaluation report and disseminate study findings.

Organization: Save the Children
Position: Consultant
Period: Aug 2015 – Feb 2016

Mapping and Size Estimation of Key Populations in Bangladesh: The purpose of this Save the Children/Global Fund assignment is to obtain a robust estimate of the size of different key populations (KPs) including young population aged 10-19 and 20-24 years (YKP). As the consultant works closely with NASP, UNAIDS, icddr,b and other stakeholders and responsible for providing technical assistance to the mapping and size estimation teams to collect data from the study locations, analyzing data for estimating size of key population at the district level, report writing and dissemination.

Organization: UNICEF
Position: Consultant
Period: Nov 2016 – Dec 2016

Development of new National Strategic Plan for HIV and AIDS 2018-2022: The purpose of this UNICEF assignment is to develop new National Strategic Plan for HIV and AIDS  2018-2022 in align with Health Population Nutrition Sector Plan 2017-2022, national, regional and global commitments. As the consultant works closely with NASP, UNAIDS, Save the Children, icddr,b and other stakeholders and responsible for conducting thematic consultation workshop, in-depth interviews with relevant stakeholders, report writing and dissemination.

Organization: UNICEF
Position: Consultant
Period: Jul 2015– Aug 2015

Completion of M&E Framework for HIV Risk Reduction Strategy for Most At Risk Adolescent (MARA) in Bangladesh and updating of National HIV M&E Framework in line with the revised 3rd National Strategic Plan for HIV and AIDS: The purpose of this UNICEF assignment is to update National HIV M&E Framework in line with the revised 3rd National Strategic Plan for HIV and AIDS as well as complete the M&E Framework for HIV Risk Reduction Strategy for Most At Risk Adolescent (MARA) in Bangladesh. As the consultant works closely with NASP, UNICEF and UNAIDS and responsible for finalizing the M&E indicators, measures targets and prepare costed implementation plan through stakeholders consolation.

Organization: Research, Training and Management (RTM) International
Position: Team Leader
Period: Dec 2014 – Jul 2015

Assessment for Implementation of Tribal Health Plan under HPNSDP in Providing HNP Services among Tribal Population in Bangladesh: The purpose of this study is to assess the implementation of planned activities of the Tribal Health Plan under HPNSDP through ESD and other relevant OPs. The study also determines socio-economic and HNP status of tribal population among tribal communities of both hill tracts and flat land in Bangladesh. As the Team Leader, responsible for providing overall guidance to the team members, report writing and dissemination of the results. The study was conducted for MOHFW under a sub-contact between Crown Agents and RTM International.

Organization: UNAIDS
Position: Consultant
Period: Dec 2014 – Apr 2015

Preparing the Investment Case for Bangladesh and popularizing the results of the Bangladesh AEM Investment Projections: The purpose of this UNAIDS assignment is to design an effective and sustainable investment option on AIDS for Bangladesh. As a technical consultant works closely with NASP, MoHFW, UNAIDS, Save the Children and icddr,b and responsible for data analysis, report writing and finalizing the investment case through stakeholders consolation.

Contact

Dr. Mohammed Nazmul Huq

Professor
Department of Statistics
Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342, Bangladesh.
Email: nhuq@juniv.edu , M.nazmulhuq@gmail.com